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U.S. Department of State

United States Department of State
Information Technology Architecture
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Volume Two
Standards Profile

April 16, 1999
Version V 2.2

Contents:

Standards Profile
1.1 Introduction
1.2 Objective
1.3 Scope
1.4 Information Architecture Standards Adoption and Retirement Process
1.5 Technical Reference Model

Acknowledgement

Attachments
A  Standard Change Proposal Form
B  Summary descriptions of candidate standards

  1. STANDARDS PROFILE
    1. 1.1 Introduction


    2. The Department of State, like other Federal agencies, is under increasing pressure to use information technology to enhance mission effectiveness. The Department recognizes this need through the development of common information technology applications, networks, databases, security, and network management capabilities. To maximize this leverage requires the Department to establish information technology architecture along with an information technology standards adoption and retirement process to ensure interoperability. These standards will assist bureaus in developing strategies and plans for acquiring information technology products and services based upon system standards that support application software interoperability, portability, and scalability.

      This set of standards represents guidance for achieving higher degrees of interoperability within the Department and its business partners. Department-wide use of these standards and their applications in contractual matters and use in information technology implementations is the goal of the Chief Information Officer (CIO). These standards must be critically considered by project managers since few single business areas, programs, business functions, or sites exist 'stand-alone' and usually depend on an infrastructure service, such as networking, and in turn others may depend on them. Deviations from these standards must be recognized by the CIO to ensure appropriate architectural adjustments are made.

    3. 1.2 Objective


    4. The focus of this document is to provide guidance and information on adopted and proposed standards that will lead the Department down the path to an open systems environment. It is designed to assist managers, project leaders, information resource management planners, and users in making an informed judgement when choosing specifications to meet current and planned requirements. Although it does not guarantee that an open system will result from its use, it does provide a starting point for users building open systems that are based upon Department-wide standards.

    5. 1.3 Scope


    6. This set of standards integrates industry, federal, national, and international standards, and even de facto standards to address a broad range of Department requirements and information technologies. Specifications are provided for the nine standards service areas described in the Technical Reference Model in the Department ITA. These particular standards were selected based upon the architecture’s guiding principles.

    7. 1.4 Information Architecture Standards Adoption and Retirement Process


    8. The 'Standards Profile' is a living document that will always be evolving based upon changing requirements and technology. It is incumbent upon organizational components to assess the applicability of both the current and the proposed standards in meeting their requirements and provide essential feedback as to their applicability. An Information Technology Architecture Standard Change Proposal Form has been provided as ATTACHMENT A to solicit, at any time, input from bureau managers and system developers on the appropriateness of the Department IT standards in this document. These inputs will be addressed through the Architecture committee of the Information Technology Review Board and appropriate responses will be made to the requestor.

    9. 1.5 Technical Reference Model


    10. In addition to the Business Requirements, the ITA consists of three technical sub-architectures: the Information layer, the Applications layer, and the Technical Infrastructure layer. These layers include several services, each of which has one or more associated standards.

      The Department of State’s Technical Reference Model is depicted below. It shows the relationships between the three technical architectural layers and their corresponding service areas.

Technical Reference Model
Figure 1, Technical Reference Model

Each service area identified in the table above has a number of commercial and Governmental standards associated with it. However, the Department has thus far adopted very few standards -- partly because it has had no official mechanism for doing so. The review period for the ITA (Volume 1) and this Standards Profile (Volume 2) offers the first significant opportunity for members of the Department worldwide to participate in the adoption of appropriate IT standards.

The following table identifies for each Technical Reference Model entry:

ATTACHMENT B provides short textual descriptions of each standard included in the table. Although the standards in the table are listed under each TRM service area, the descriptions of those items in Attachment B are arranged in alphabetical sequence based on the short identifiers shown in the table.

Table 1, Candidate Standards

TRM Elements

Existing DoS Standards

Proposed DoS Standards

Other Relevant Standards

Widely Used by DoS

Support Application Areas

Office Automation

 

 

 

Microsoft Office

E-Mail

X.400 (&APIs)

SMTP

MIME

 

Microsoft Exchange

Workflow Management

 

 

 

 

Document Management

 

 

 

 

Collaborative Work

 

 

 

MS Project

MS Outlook

Primavera

Case Management

 

 

 

 

Platform Services

Client Services

 

HTTP

RPC

MS Windows

 

Development

 

C++ JAVA

COBOL

PCTE

PILOT

 

Data Management

Data Administration

CORBA

Data Stds & Guidelines

RDA

SQL (& Environment)

CSMF

IDEFIX

IDEFO

ORACLE

SQL Server

Data Interchange Services

 

EDI Postscript

GIF RTF

GILS SGML

HTML VTS

JPEG

CDIF HDF

CGM ODA

CMP DPF

DDF SPDL

EMPM Z39.2

GKS

Intersolv ODBC

Network Services

TCP/IP (&IP)

DNS NETBIOS

FP TELNET

RIP

BGP4

EGP

OSPF

DLSW

SNMP

OSPF

POSIT

Z39.5

Cisco IOS 11.2.16

Directory Services

X.500

Directory APIs

LDAP

XFN

Cisco Network Register

Operating System Services

 

POSIX (&APIs)

 

Microsoft NT Server

Security Services

DES

FIPS 140-1

TACAS

Digital Signature Std.

S-HTTP

SSL S/MIME

X.509 IPSEC

DAA

Entity Authentication

IPSO

Key Management

POSIX-security

AFC2

Cisco DES

Cisco TACAS

IRE

Enterprise Management Services

 

SNMP-V2

GNMP

ISO 9000

MS SMS

HP Openview

TAVE

Remedy

Communications

 

 

 

Network Associates TN3270

Transaction Processing

 

 

 

CICS

Oracle Client

MS IE 4.x

Hardware Platform

Work Stations/PCs

ALMA

 

 

 

  1. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The effort to create this ITA was a significant team effort that required the dedication of the following individuals and their organizations:

State Department Managers

Don Hunter, DCIO/APR
Greg Linden, APR/IAP/AE
Ken Alms, APR/IAP/PL

Contractor Support

AT&T
     Kevin Kavanaugh

FCI
     Barry Finklestein

J.G. Van Dyke
     Craig Jenkins
     Tom Meier
     Angie Spencer
     Andy Tainter

ManTech International
     Richard Lee Doty

Consultants
     Wally Francis
     Karl Sanger

Attachments

A  Standard Change Proposal Form

B  Summary descriptions of candidate standards