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U.S. Department of State

Department Seal Reorganization Plan and Report
Submitted by President Clinton to the Congress on December 30, 1998, Pursuant to Section 1601 of the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998, as Contained in Public Law 105-277

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Foreword

The Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998 provides the authority to implement the Administration's plan to reorganize and strengthen the foreign affairs agencies. This initiative, which the President announced on April 18, 1997, emerged from productive consultations with the Congress and enjoys bipartisan support. Under the leadership of Vice President Gore, the Reorganization Plan and Report being submitted today were designed with careful attention to preserve the unparalleled capabilities and skills of the foreign affairs agencies and their personnel. Reorganization enhances the ability of the United States to meet the international challenges of the next century by placing arms control and nonproliferation, public diplomacy, and sustainable development at the heart of our foreign policy. The Administration will work closely and cooperatively with the Congress to implement this integration.

This Reorganization Plan and Report, developed through the cooperative efforts of the Department of State, the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, the United States Information Agency, and the United States Agency for International Development, describe how reorganization will be implemented. As a result, U.S. foreign policy will benefit in a number of important ways:

The human dimension of reorganization is vital. Specific positions are being identified for every employee who will be transferred. There are no plans for a reduction-in-force, although over time integration will yield efficiencies as well as improve effectiveness. The Act gives the Secretary of State the flexibility needed to align people and positions most effectively.

As integration advances, State will continue intensive efforts to reinvent itself. Integration offers more scope for this and widens the circle of opportunity to restructure and adopt best practices. State has already taken some important steps. The Under Secretaries have assumed responsibility as State's Corporate Board, chaired by the Deputy Secretary, and the Assistant Secretaries have been given more autonomy in resource management. Performance Planning has been redesigned greatly to enhance the alignment of strategy and resources.

Finally, increased efficiency is very important, but is not, by itself, enough to assure U.S. leadership in the world. For this, the foreign affairs agencies must have the wherewithal to meet growing responsibilities and take full advantage of new opportunities. American strength today results from our predecessors' bold decisions and timely investments, beginning with Lend Lease and the Marshall Plan. The Administration's plan does not propose anything this expensive, but we have to do better in order to seize the initiative. Embassy bombings in East Africa, the international financial crisis, instability in the Middle East, Kosovo, and Russia, and risks that nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons will proliferate show how the world remains dangerous and uncertain. Therefore, it is vital that our country has the resources it needs for a strong foreign policy that serves America's interests.

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Reorganization Plan
Reorganization Report
Fact Sheet

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