Treaties in Force and PDF Reader Downloading Instructions

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There are two versions of this document available. The first option is a 3.2 MB file in PDF format. The other option is a compressed 2.2 MB file, also in PDF format. The compressed version will be expanded by the WINZIP program included in Windows/Windows 95, and Windows NT operating systems, and is included here for the convenience of shorter download time.

If you have never used PDF documents before, these instructions are intended to provide a step-by-step guide on how to download the document and download the free Adobe PDF reader. Although it does take some time, you will be pleasantly surprised at the ease of the process, and the utility of having the document loaded on your machine.

The Treaties in Force document will take approximately 30 minutes to download the entire 3.2 MB file if you are using a 28.8 modem. Downloading the PDF reader should take approximately another 30 minutes. The exact download times are dependent upon the number of users utilizing the site, the speed of your modem, and the capacity of your connection. Remember that you will only do this ONCE, and when finished, you will have a working document on your machine, complete with a hypertext-linked table of contents. The document can be accessed anytime on your machine without delay.


1. To download the Treaties in Force document, click on the linked area "Select document here (3.2 MB PDF format)" and a window will appear on the top left of your screen asking you where you want to store the file on your hard drive.


2. Select a file location and start the download. The default filename is "tifjan.pdf" and is named in this manner to help identify which version you are using. Future versions will be named in a similar manner (i.e. tifjan97.pdf, tifjun97.pdf, etc.) for ease of identification.


3. When TIF download is complete, click on the "Adobe Reader" button to begin download of the reader.


4. You will first be linked to the Adobe page where some selections are required. Scroll down the page and locate the two boxes where you must identify the version of reader that matches your operating system (i.e. Windows, Windows NT, Windows 95, etc.). The second box identifies the language version you want.


5. Once your selections have been made, click on the "OK" box to begin downloading the reader. Select a file location (suggest C:\temp but it could be any location), and begin the download.


6. When download is completed, close your web browser. Then using file manager (found in the "Main" group of Windows program manager) double-click on the file name you just downloaded (this will likely be "C:\temp\ar16e30.exe if you are using Windows) and follow the instructions that will appear on your screen. The file will install itself on your hard drive and your work is now complete!


7. You can now view the TIF PDF file at any time by using file manager and double-clicking on "tifjan.pdf" (or later version when made available). The PDF reader will automatically launch itself and the TIF will appear on the right side of your screen, with an index on the left side that is linked to the appropriate sections of the document. The PDF reader also allows you to perform word searches within the document, and to print individual or multiple pages that will appear exactly as the document originals were constructed. The PDF reader has a help file that will explain these and many other features that are now available to you.