U.S. Department of State
Other State Department Archive SitesU.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
The State Department web site below is a permanent electronic archive of information released online from January 1, 1997 to January 20, 2001. Please see www.state.gov for current material from the Department of State. Or visit http://2001-2009.state.gov for information from that period. Archive sites are not updated, so external links may no longer function. Contact us with any questions about finding information. NOTE: External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views contained therein.
U.S. Department of State

greatseal U.S. Refugee Admissions Program
Eligibility for Refugee Processing Priorities FY 2000

Fact Sheet released by the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration
U.S. Department of State, January 18, 2000

bluebar

P-1 Processing: All Nationalities Are Eligible

NATIONALITIES

P-2(1)

P-3

P-4

Angolans  

X

 
Bosnians(2)

X

X

X

Burmese

X

   
Burundians  

X

 
Cameroonians  

X

 
Chadians  

X

 
Congolese (Brazzaville)  

X

 
Congolese (DROC)  

X

 
Cubans

X

   
Djiboutians  

X

 
Eritreans  

X

 
Ethiopians  

X

 
Former Soviet Union

X

   
Guinea Bissauans  

X

 
Iranians

X

X

 
Iraqis  

X

 
Liberians(4)  

X

 
Nigerians(5)

X

X

 
Rwandans  

X

 
Sierra Leoneans  

X

 
Somalis  

X

 
Sudanese  

X

 
Togolese  

X

 
Ugandans   

X

 
Vietnamese(6)

X

   
bluebar

PRIORITY ONE:

UNHCR or U.S. embassy identified cases: persons facing compelling security concerns in countries of first asylum; persons in need of legal protection because of the danger of refoulement; those in danger due to threats of armed attack in an area where they are located; persons who have experienced recent persecution because of their political, religious, or human rights activities -- prisoners of conscience;-- women-at-risk; victims of torture or violence; physically or mentally disabled persons; persons in urgent need of medical treatment not available in the first asylum country; and persons for whom other durable solutions are not feasible and whose status in the place of asylum does not present a satisfactory long-term solution. As with all other priorities, Priority One referrals must still establish a creditable fear of persecution or history of persecution in the country from which they fled.

PRIORITY TWO: Groups of Special Concern

Africa: Specific groups -- within certain nationalities -- as identified by the Department of State in consultation with NGOs, UNHCR, INS, and other area experts. Only those members of the specifically identified groups are eligible for processing. Each group will be selected based on its individual circumstances.

Bosnia: Former detainees who were held on account of ethnicity or political/religious opinion; persons of any ethnic background in mixed marriages; victims of torture or systematic and significant acts of violence against members of targeted ethnic groups by governmental authorities or quasi-governmental authorities in areas under their control; surviving spouses of civilians who would have been eligible under these criteria if they had not died in detention or been killed as a result of torture or violence. Effective as of January 1, 1997.

Burma: Certain members of ethnic minorities who have actively and persistently worked for political autonomy; certain political activists engaged in the pro-democracy movement.

Cuba: In-country. Emphasis given to former political prisoners, members of persecuted religious minorities, human rights activists, forced-labor conscripts, persons deprived of their professional credentials or subjected to other disproportionately harsh or discriminatory treatment resulting from their perceived or actual political or religious beliefs or activities, dissidents, and other refugees of compelling concern to the United States.

Iran: Members of Iranian Religious Minorities.

Former Soviet Union: In-country. Jews, Evangelical Christians, and certain members of the Ukrainian Catholic or Orthodox churches. Preference among these groups is accorded to those with close family members in the United States.

Vietnam: In-country. Former reeducation camp detainees who spent more than three years in detention camps subsequent to April 1975 because of pre-1975 association with the U.S. government of the former South Vietnamese government; certain former U.S. Government employees and other specified individuals or groups of concern; persons who returned from first-asylum camps in Southeast Asia on or after October 1, 1995 who qualify for consideration under the Resettlement Opportunities for Vietnamese Returnees (ROVR) criteria. Completion of the processing of any residual ODP cases registered and determined eligible for consideration prior to the beginning of FY 2000.

PRIORITY THREE:

Spouses, unmarried sons and daughters, and parents of persons lawfully admitted to the United States as permanent resident aliens, refugees, asylees, conditional residents, and certain parolees; the over-21-year- old unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. citizens; and parents of U.S. citizens under 21 years of age. (Spouses and unmarried sons and daughters under 21 of U.S. citizens and the parents of U.S. citizens who are 21 or older are required by regulation to be admitted as immigrants rather than as refugees.)

PRIORITY FOUR:

Grandparents, grandchildren, married sons and daughters, and siblings of U.S. citizens and persons lawfully admitted to the United States as permanent resident aliens, refugees, asylees, conditional residents, and certain parolees. (As of November 1, 1999, registration for Priority 4 Bosnian processing was closed.)

NOTES:

The UNHCR or U.S. Embassies may refer members of any nationality group-not only those listed in the table above-for consideration of admission to the United States under Priority 1 (P-1). For certain nationalities -- Libyans, Palestinians, and North Koreans -- prior consultation with the Department of State and INS Washington will be required.

(1) See explanation of groups of special concern under Priority 2 (P-2).

(2) As of November 1, 1999, registration for Priority 4 Bosnian Processing was closed.

(3) While all persons who were nationals of the former Soviet Union prior to September 2, 1991 are eligible to be considered for refugee processing by establishing a well-founded fear of persecution, Jews, Evangelical Christians, and Ukrainian Catholic and Orthodox religious activists may establish refugee status for U.S. admission by asserting a fear of persecution and asserting a credible basis of concern about the possibility of such persecution. (Lautenberg Amendment.)

(4) In January 1998, the USG implemented a P-2 processing program for Africa. In this program, specific and identifiable groups in designated locations will become eligible for resettlement processing. To date, P-2 designations have included Hutu/Tutsi mixed marriage protection cases in a camp in Tanzania, groups of Ogoni and Togolese refugees in Benin, and Somali Bantu refugees in Kenya. Other groups will also be designated for P-2 processing.

(5) Certain ROVR applicants and Vietnamese who were members of certain category groups identified by the INS in 1983 may establish refugee status for U.S. admission by asserting a fear of persecution and asserting a credible basis of concern about the possibility of such persecution. (Lautenberg Amendment.) Registration for consideration under the regular programs of the Orderly Departure Program ended on September 30, 1994.

(6) Given the backlog of an estimated 35,000 P-3 applicants for Somalis, the filing of new affidavits of relationship has been suspended in FY 2000 while existing cases are addressed and the situation in the region is reviewed.

[end of document]

bluebar

Admissions and Resettlement | Population, Refugees, and Migration