U.S. Department of State
Other State Department Archive SitesU.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
U.S. Department of State
The State Department web site below is a permanent electronic archive of information released online from January 1, 1997 to January 20, 2001. Please see www.state.gov for current material from the Department of State. Or visit http://2001-2009.state.gov for information from that period. Archive sites are not updated, so external links may no longer function. Contact us with any questions about finding information. NOTE: External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views contained therein.
U.S. Department of State

Department Seal

Combating Terrorism: The Paris Ministerial

Fact sheet released at the Ministerial Meeting on Terrorism in Paris, France, July 30, 1996.

flag
bar

Under the leadership of President Clinton, the U.S. has pressed an international campaign to combat terrorism. Commitments made at Paris build on principles agreed upon at the June 1996 Lyon Summit, as well as the Halifax Summit and Ottawa Ministerial in 1995 (see background below).

Paris Achievements. The July 30 Ministerial Meeting on Terrorism in Paris was the latest in a series of international meetings in which the Eight (the United States, Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and Russia) endorsed 25 explicit ways to enhance cooperation in the fight against terrorism and transnational crime. The members of the Eight urged all states to join in these efforts. At Paris, the Eight committed to strengthen counterterrorism cooperation by improving security procedures, prosecuting and punishing terrorists, tightening border controls, expanding international treaties outlawing terrorism, and preventing terrorists' fundraising. At the urging of the United States, the Eight agreed to ensure implementation of the 25 measures "without delay" and called on terrorism experts to meet before the end of the year to assess the implementation of the initiatives.

Among the most notable new achievements of Paris are the following:

Protecting Mass Transportation: In view of terrorist attacks on air, rail, subway, and bus transport systems, the Eight agreed to the following U.S. proposals to help prevent and solve terrorist crimes:

Declaring Terrorist Bombings an International Crime: International agreements exist which outlaw attacks on air and maritime transportation, but no international agreement outlaws terrorist bombing attacks, for example, on public buildings or ground transportation. The Eight agreed to:

Criminalizing Possession of Biological Weapons: To deal with the threat of terrorist use of biological weapons, states must act to outlaw individuals' possession or use of such deadly tools; the existing Biological Weapons Convention only expressly prohibits abuse by nations, not individuals or groups. The Eight agreed to:

Stopping Terrorists from Using Encryption: Terrorists' use of encrypted computer communications hampers investigators' speed in averting planned attacks and apprehending those responsible. The Eight agreed to:

Further U.S. Steps and Assistance. In addition to the steps announced by the Eight, the United States urges all interested states to join us in going even further in fighting terrorism and transnational crime. We pledge to move forward with this joint effort in two technical areas:

Background on Halifax, Ottawa, and Lyon Meetings

At Halifax: In June 1995, the Eight leaders met at the Halifax Summit and adopted broad principles to combat terrorism. These were developed further at the Ottawa Ministerial on Terrorism (December 1995). The Ottawa Declaration called on all nations to:

At Lyon: At the June 1996 Lyon Summit, the Eight endorsed 40 practical steps that all governments should take to combat international crime and terrorism, and authorized their Experts Group to take specific actions on these recommendations in each of these areas prior to the 1997 Denver Summit. In particular, they urged cooperation to:

[end of document]

flag
bar

Department Seal

Return to the Home Page
This is an official U.S. Government source for information on the WWW. Inclusion of non-U.S. Government links does not imply endorsement of contents.