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U.S. Department of State

U.S. Department of State

Implementing the Dayton Peace Accords:
The Role of the U.S. in Civilian Implementation

Released by the Bureau of Public Affairs, March 5, 1996


Experience has shown that United States leadership is essential to the peace process. Our own active engagement on the key civilian implementation tasks is essential to attracting far greater resources, support, and services from our European allies, Japan, and other friends for this essential effort. Continued American leadership is vital if we are going to continue to stand up for what is right--for the people of Bosnia, for Europe, and for the United States.

In fiscal year 1996, the Clinton Administration currently estimates spending a total of $539 million in support of civilian implementation of the Dayton Peace Accords. Over 60% of these funds ($339 million) will come from already-appropriated funds in International Affairs accounts.

An additional $200 million is required to help ensure the successful implementation of the Dayton Peace Accords in 1996. These funds are part of a supplemental request President Clinton submitted to the Congress on February 21. This additional $200 million would come from already-appropriated monies; it is fully offset by rescissions from funds available to the Defense Department.

Since 1991, the U.S. has provided $1 billion to Bosnia, primarily in humanitarian assistance. In fiscal year 1996, the U.S. intends to provide $162 million in urgently-needed humanitarian assistance to help the Bosnian people by providing emergency food and clothing and other essential items.

While in Paris for the signing of the Dayton Peace Accords, President Clinton announced an $86 million package for humanitarian and economic reconstruction assistance to help meet the immediate needs of the people of Bosnia. The bulk of this "Quick Impact" package is humanitarian aid to help the Bosnian people through the harsh months of winter by providing emergency food and clothing and by repairing houses, apartments, hospitals, roads, gas lines, and heating systems.

As the situation stabilizes, U.S. assistance programs are moving from emergency humanitarian aid to longer-term programs aimed at the reconstruction of the Bosnian economy.

The U.S. contribution would provide assistance to help the people of Bosnia rehabilitate their infrastructure, revitalize their economy, hold free and fair democratic elections and otherwise build a democratic state, protect and promote human rights, remove mines, and create an effective local police force.

On-the-ground support for these activities requires coordination by the Department of State and enhanced operations for both the Agency for International Development and the U.S. Information Agency. The U.S. maintains an Embassy in Sarajevo.


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Last Updated: March 5, 1996