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U.S. Department of State

Department Seal The New Transatlantic Agenda
Fact sheet released by the Bureau
of European and Canadian Affairs,
U.S. Department of State, May 26, 1998

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The New Transatlantic Agenda (NTA), launched in December 1995, provides a framework for managing and enlarging our cooperation with the EU. It reinforces our bilateral relations with the EU member states and offers a framework for engaging the EU as a whole through a regular consultative process involving the EU Presidency country and the European Commission.

The NTA lays out an ambitious agenda for expanding U.S.-EU cooperation on promoting peace, stability, democracy, and development around the world; responding to global challenges; contributing to the expansion of world trade and closer economic relations; and "building bridges" between Americans and Europeans of the post-Cold War generation.

A key element of the U.S.-EU worldwide partnership is intensified diplomatic cooperation. The U.S. and the EU are, for example, working together to support reconstruction and reconciliation in Bosnia, promote needed reform in Ukraine, and improve nuclear safety in northwest Russia. The U.S. also is working with the EU to reinforce political and economic cooperation with Turkey, and we have encouraged dialogue among the parties in the Middle East Peace Process.

The U.S. and the EU have undertaken several new initiatives to expand cooperation on law enforcement, counternarcotics, environmental degradation, and health issues. U.S.-EU consultations have spurred development of a successful joint counternarcotics program in the Caribbean, exchanges of law enforcement officials, and an information campaign to combat trafficking in women in Poland and Ukraine. The U.S. and the EU have recently begun to discuss ways to improve counternarcotics activities in the Andean region.

Joint U.S. and EU trade efforts are helping to reduce transatlantic barriers and support the multilateral trading system. The U.S. and the EU are discussing a new initiative to remove trade barriers and create a New Transatlantic Marketplace. The U.S. and the EU are working diligently to resolve important trade differences in the areas of Specified Risk Materials and Genetically Modified Organisms. Within the next few months, the U.S. and the EU will sign a Positive Comity agreement on enforcement of competition laws. Our governments are cooperating closely with the Transatlantic Business Dialogue (TABD), a U.S.-European business partnership, to address a wide range of trade barriers important to the business community.

A key part of the agenda is a fourth chapter dealing with "building bridges" between the different constituencies in the transatlantic community. At the May 18 summit, the U.S. and the EU presented the first U.S.-EU Democracy and Civil Society Awards to NGOs and individuals from some 26 central and eastern Europe and New Independent States (NIS) countries who have excelled in promoting democratic values and civil society. The U.S. and the EU are also working to launch an ongoing dialogue that will focus on consumer issues in the transatlantic marketplace.

[End of Document]

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