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South Sudan Online Project

A ReliefWeb and GDIN Cooperative Information Exchange

Edited by Department of State, Washington, DC, 10/15/00

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Maps & Links Special B&W Sudan Map Airstrip and Village Maps
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Background

South Sudan OnLine is an experiment that been running with success since 1997 in cooperation with ReliefWeb and GDIN. It posts maps, imagery and web links on remote relief camps in South Sudan. Some of the things we are looking for are unexploded bombs. The survey began in Yambio, where an unexploded "bomb" was found in 1995. The bomb was not reported to have been destroyed until, June 21, 1999. See Yambio.

Four unexploded ordnance devices are also reported to be in Akobo in the Upper Nile area, near the Ethiopian border. Additionally, there were reports of bombings in Lainya and Kaaya on the 23rd of July, 1999 in which some have alleged biological or chemical warfare. There is no direct evidence of that allegation, as of October, 2000; but relief workers should remain on alert. For information on these and other bombings, see the Sudan section of ReliefWeb.

Locally based relief workers tell us that many "bombs" that are dropped are in fact drums or similar containers, loaded with metal shards and not containing explosives. But any devise that looks like a bomb should be treated like one. If you would like to see a video of an airdrop of relief supplies, go to the World Vision site.